About this Blog: Bread making recipes, knit and crochet projects, wood working, gardening, digital imaging, travel, cruise ships, Labrador Retrievers, and more....

About the Header Image: Idlebrook Wendy Darling Evensen, the baby of our family.

Friday, April 30, 2010

Multi Grain and Rich Egg Marble Bread - Recipe

Good morning,

Today I've made Marble Bread using two of my recipes:  Multi-Grain and Rich Egg Bread.

My Rich Egg Bread recipe was published earlier. 

The Multi-Grain Bread and the Rich Egg Bread are each fantastic all by themselves.  I am using these two together for Marble Bread because both breads have a similar texture so work well together.

This marble bread recipe makes four standard size loaves - a whole lot of bread!  I don't recommend refrigerating or freezing fresh bread, but you can do that if you really want to.  I prefer to give away what my family can't eat in the first day or two.  Remember that all of my breads are made without preservatives so they don't last for a week or more as many commercial breads do.

Enjoy!

Lois

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Multi-Grain Bread and Rich Egg Bread Marble Bread - Recipe
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Prepare my Rich Egg Bread recipe and set aside.  Cover with a cool damp cloth and set aside in a cool place (not refrigerator.) Do not place it in a warm place to encourage the first rise until the Multi-Grain Bread recipe (see below) is ready for the first rise.
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Multi-Grain Bread Recipe
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Ingredients:

1 egg

2 T vegetable oil

2 t salt

1/4 cup brown sugar

2 T honey

2 T nonfat dry milk
 
2 T cocoa

1 1/4 cups coffee (at room temperature)

1 cup rye flour
 
1 cup whole wheat four

2 1/2 cups bread (or all purpose, but not self rising) flour

2 rounded t dry yeast

Place all ingredients in large capacity bread machine in order given. 

Set on dough cycle and turn on.

The first dough cycle on most machines is about 40 minutes. 
 
Watch the action to be sure a dough ball forms at least 1/3 way through the cycle. 

Add a little flour or water if necessary to get the correct consistency.

When first dough cycle finished, remove from machine and place in a greased bowl for first rise. 

Now place both the Egg Bread and the Multi-Grain Bread dough in a warm place such as the oven with the light, but no heat turned on. 

If you place it out on the counter in a warm place, cover with a damp cloth. 

These two batches required about 1 hour for the first rise. Keep in mind that the temperature in your kitchen and the mood of the yeast can change the time required for the dough to rise.

If you are using crockery or glass pans/bowls for baking, set the empty bread pans in a warm place, too. I use my ovens with the lights turned on.

Spray baking pans with vegetable oil.

After the first rise, punch down/knead gently the dough to remove excess bubbles.

Wash and flour a working surface where you can work with portions of each batch of bread. 

The recipes each make two loaves of bread.

You'll see in the images that I combined the bread dough in several different ways to demonstrate very different results in your loaf of bread.

Flatten 1/4 of the batch of the light and 1/4 of the batch of the dark dough into long ovals. 

Place one on top of the other and roll together. 

Slice into four parts and place one into each of four sections of a four loaf pan.

Flatten 1/4 of each batch of bread, flatten each color, roll together, and place the whole thing in a standard size loaf pan.

Flatten remaining dough, roll together, and place in remaining pans. 

To demonstrate some of the possibilities, I used pans of different sizes rolling some loaves with dark dough on the outside, some with the dark dough on the inside.

When it is finished rising the second time, bake at 350 F for 35 mins if using small pans similar to those in the images. If using 4 standard loaf pans, bake at 350 F for 45 mins.

Remove from oven, turn out to cooling racks immediately.

Click here for more of my bread recipes.

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Thursday, April 29, 2010

Bread Baking Proofing Baskets and Pans


Good morning,
 
New toys!  I just got some new toys!

My honey and I have certain types of stores we consider our toy stores:  those include computer stores, hardware stores, yarn/fabric and hobby stores, kitchen stores....  

In our travels I had been looking for a new Banneton proofing basket.  It's used for the second rise of bread to form the loaf with distinctive rings.  After seeing them in the stores for a ridiculous price, I found just what I wanted on Amazon.  

I don't use the proofing basket often since I usually divide dough into smaller quantities to be able to share with others, but it is nice to have to prepare a pretty loaf when serving a large group of people.

There are also plastic proofing baskets that produce the same rings on the dough while it is rising. I think I need some new ones of those, too.  :)

While I was ordering the proofing basket, I replaced my bread pans that are perfect for making 4 half loaves.  

The form and pans arrived quickly so I had to use them right away. 
 
Pictured is my Cream Cheese and Chives Bread recipe.  

In addition to bread pans, you can bake bread in just about anything that is oven safe such as pie pans, corning ware, or other casserole dishes.   I'm sure I've used just about everything that is oven safe in my kitchen to bake bread at one time or another.

You don't have to have special toys, but it sure is fun.

Very best,
Lois

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Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Chicken Liver Pate - Recipe


Good morning,

You either love this or you you hate it.  There is no middle ground with liver pate.

My family just loves liver pate and when a family dinner event is being planned I am asked, "You ARE going to make liver pate, aren't you, Mom?"

I've made several variations of this over the years, but this is the basic recipe.

Enjoy!

Lois

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Chicken Liver Pate
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Ingredients:

1.25 lbs. chicken livers

4 T butter (1/2 stick)

2 onions

1 T minced garlic

1/2 cup mayonnaise


1 t salt (plain, seasoned, or celery salt)

1 t pepper

1 t parsley flakes (or 3 t fresh parsley)

1/2 t paprika

2 hard boiled eggs (cooled)

Optional:  1 stick celery and/or 1/2 carrot raw added when blending.

In skillet place butter, ONE onion chopped, and liver.

Cook over medium heat until liver is fully cooked, be careful not to burn edges of liver or you'll change the flavor of your pate.

Set aside to cool.

Cut up second onion and place in food processor with 2 hard boiled eggs (cooled), minced garlic, salt, paprika, pepper, parsley, mayonnaise, and cooled liver mixture.

Process until smooth. Texture will be soft, but not runny.

It will thicken/harden when refrigerated.

Refrigerate immediately and serve cold on onion chive bread, matzo or other crackers.

Word to the wise: Rinse liver mixture from your food processor and utensils immediately. After it dries, it's very difficult to remove.

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Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Flat Bread - Recipe


Good morning,

I had this post all together and ready to go for today as I was packing last night with my honey.  We are going out of town for awhile.  My computer goes wherever I go so I'll still be blogging, just from different places.

Anyway, here we both were on the second floor, in our own little worlds getting things together for our trip.  We do this every few weeks so it has become routine to pack the clothes and knitting needles, transfer the computer files.... Catherine, our daughter, had been at a dog show with our yellow Lab, Penny.  About 10:30 PM, Catherine called to say she and Penny were on the way home and asked me to put on a pot of coffee.  Sure, no problem.

I went down the main staircase and immediately was in shock and distress.  There, in the entrance hall and into the living room, Erik, our sweet year old black Lab had chewed open a new box of black printer ink.  He must have had a good time tearing the whole thing open because there was black ink everywhere on our medium blue carpet.   We couldn't see any on  him, but he is a black Lab dressed in black ink camouflage so of course we couldn't see any black ink. First I determined he didn't have ink in his mouth so he must have just punctured the ink cartridge and spent most of his time throwing it around the room and tearing up the cardboard box.  He's such a happy guy.

I love the Internet.  While I was checking Erik, my honey went on line to figure out what we could use to remove the ink that I was sure had destroyed our carpet.  Sure enough, he found a video explaining how to use WD-40, wait awhile, then clean (scrub) with detergent (I used Dawn) and warm water, then rinse.  Amazingly, it worked.  Catherine arrived to bring our carpet cleaner from the basement and gave the whole thing a good warm water rinse.

So, if anyone else has a problem with permanent ink on the carpet, before you suffer cardiac arrest, saturate it with WD-40, wait a few minutes, then scrub with some Dawn detergent in warm water and a sponge or rag.  It works.  I was too busy scrubbing to take any pictures to share, but they are burned in my mind and I am sure you can imagine the horror of it all:  Is Erik OK?  And, now that we know Erik is OK, what the heck can we do about the carpet....

After telling Erik how wrong it was to take the box of ink from the desk in the sitting room and spread it around the living room, we made up and had some cuddle time.  I have been calling Erik "Inky Erik" all day today.  

And, now, to the post I had prepared for today:

Today's bread is a favorite of my daughter's.  She likes flat bread to make sandwiches with the soft crust on top and bottom to keep fillings well contained.  She also likes to slice flat bread, cut into triangles, and toast on a cookie sheet in the oven to use with dip. 

For this particular batch I divided the recipe to make some flat bread and some as loaves to give as gifts.

In addition to being another way to eat good bread, an advantage of making flat bread is that you don't wait for the second rise so you can have it much sooner than waiting for bread made as loaves.

Making flat bread is getting close to making pizza crust.  That's also easy to make and I'll share that here soon, too.

The recipe below will yield two standard size loaves.  Directions are included for both the flat bread and loaves.

Enjoy!

Lois


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Flat Bread -  Recipe
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Ingredients:

2 eggs

2 T vegetable oil

2 t salt

2 T sugar

1/3 cup plain (or vanilla) yogurt

1 cup warm water

5 cups bread (or all purpose, but not self rising) flour

2 rounded t dry yeast

Place all ingredients in large capacity bread machine in order given.

Set on dough cycle and turn on.

The first dough cycle on most machines is about 40 minutes.

Watch the action to be sure a dough ball forms at least 1/3 way through the cycle.

Add a little flour or water if necessary to get the correct consistency.

When first dough cycle finished, remove from machine and place in a greased bowl for first rise.

Place the bowl in a warm place such as the oven with the light, but no heat turned on.

If you place it out on the counter in a warm place, cover with a damp cloth.

This batch required about 2 hours for the first rise. Keep in mind that the temperature in your kitchen and the mood of the yeast can change the time required for the dough to rise.

If you are using crockery or glass pans/bowls for baking, set the empty bread pans in a warm place, too. I use my second oven with the light turned on.

If preheating pans, remove from oven.

Spray pans with vegetable oil..

After the first rise, punch down/knead gently the dough to remove excess bubbles.

I divided this batch between flat bread and small loaves.

For the flat bread, grease or spray cookie sheets with vegetable oil, form a baseball size ball of dough in your hands, then flatten and place on cookie sheet.

Two balls this size should be right for a standard cookie sheet.

With fingers, gently spread/flatten it being careful not to tear the dough.

Using a large fork, poke holes into the dough to ventilate.

Bake immediately at 350 F for 35 minutes or until golden brown.

Remove from sheets immediately and place on rack to cool.

If making a split batch of flat bread and loaf bread:

With the remaining dough, divide for number of baking dishes you are using, shape to fit the pans, and place in bread pans.

Place in warm place again for second rise.

When it is finished rising the second time, bake at 350 F for 35 mins if using small pans similar to those in the images.

If using 2 standard loaf pans, bake at 350 F for 45 mins.

Remove from oven, turn out to cooling racks immediately.

The sandwiches in the image were made by cutting the round flat bread in quarters, then filling with seafood salad, lettuce, tomato, and sprouts. The oval shaped flat bread can be cut lengthwise, then split to make two larger pocket sandwiches.

Yum!

Click here for more of my bread recipes.

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Monday, April 26, 2010

Heirlooms - If Only They Could Talk

This lovely cross stitch on a linen hand towel is part of a treasure chest of beautiful items I inherited from my Mother.  I display this one in the bathroom, but we don't use it.  Every once in awhile I wash it gently to freshen it up.  I was ironing it when I stopped to think about who made it.  I'm not quite sure if it was my mother, her mother, my father's mother, or some other relative.
I know Mom embroidered and tatted because she taught both to me, but I also have a letter from my mother to my father's mother thanking her for the hand towels.  My Dad inherited the letter my mother had written to his mother when his mother died.  How sweet that his mother had saved the thank you note from her daughter-in-law. 

Could this have been one of the towels? 
  Or, could have it been this linen towel with the tatted edges.  
These two images are of opposite ends of the same towel.

If one or both of my grandmothers was involved with these towels, the towels probably would have been made between 1880 and 1920.  My goodness, they are in beautiful condition 100 years or so later.

Perhaps the tatted towel was made by my maternal grandmother.  My mother tatted and learned the art from her mother, but this is a different style than what I saw my mother making.  I also have pillow cases with similar tatting.  I know my mother did not make those, but it is not clear which relative did.

So, these items will continue to hold their secrets.  I enjoy knowing they were made by my relatives and am now finally going to get them framed and protected under glass.

Do you have similar items?  Hopefully, you still have someone alive in your family who can tell you the stories behind them. If so, it would be so great to write those stories down and put them with the item for the next generations. 

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Sunday, April 25, 2010

Oats and Honey Bread - Recipe


Good morning,

Here is another classic bread. I like this bread to make bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwiches.

This particular day, though, I had a request from my daughter for dinner rolls.  I split the batch to make both dinner rolls and loaves so everyone was happy.  :)

Enjoy,

Lois

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Oats and Honey Bread
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Ingredients:

1 egg

2 T vegetable oil

2 t salt

3 T honey

2 T brown sugar

1 oz cream cheese

1 cup water

1 cup oats

3 1/2 cups bread (or all purpose, but not self rising) flour

2 rounded t dry yeast

Place all ingredients in large capacity bread machine in order given. Set on dough cycle and turn on.

The first dough cycle on most machines is about 40 minutes. Watch the action to be sure a dough ball forms at least 1/3 way through the cycle. Add a little flour or water if necessary to get the correct consistency.

When first dough cycle finished, remove from machine and place in a greased bowl for first rise. Place the bowl in a warm place such as the oven with the light, but no heat turned on. If you place it out on the counter in a warm place, cover with a damp cloth. This batch required about 1 1/4 hours for the first rise. Keep in mind that the temperature in your kitchen and the mood of the yeast can change the time required for the dough to rise.

If you are using crockery or glass pans/bowls for baking, set the empty bread pans in a warm place, too. I use my second oven with the light turned on.

If preheating pans, remove from oven.

Spray pans with vegetable oil.

After the first rise, knead the dough gently to remove bubbles.

Divide for number of baking dishes you are using, shape to fit the pans, and place in bread pans. Place in warm place again for second rise.

When it is finished rising the second time, bake at 350 F for 40 mins if using pans similar to those in the images. If using 2 standard loaf pans, bake at 350 F for 45 mins.

Remove from oven, turn out to cooling racks immediately.

Click here for more of my bread recipes.

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